THE HOUSE

The House History

In March of 1954 the prominent third notary from Santafé de Bogotá, Mr. Arteaga, ordered the construction of a house for his wife, Mrs. Sara de Arteaga, and their four children in Bosque Calderón neighborhood. This place is known today as Chapinero Alto. The then renowned architect of Italian descent, Jorge Brunet, was in charge of such honorable work, for which on March 24 he issued the registration Number 119 for the construction known as “Arteaga House”, located back then in 3rd street with 54th-21st.

The house consisted of two upper levels, a lower level, five bedrooms, three bathrooms, a living room, a kitchen, a storage room, a maid’s room, a garage, a courtyard, among other facilities. Architect Brunet, influenced to a great extent by his Italian roots, used an architectural language regarded as “Art Nouveau”, which would later become known as Art Deco; a very famous style in the 1950´s.

In March of 1954 the prominent third notary from Santafé de Bogotá, Mr. Arteaga, ordered the construction of a house for his wife, Mrs. Sara de Arteaga, and their four children in Bosque Calderón neighborhood. This place is known today as Chapinero Alto. The then renowned architect of Italian descent, Jorge Brunet, was in charge of such honorable work, for which on March 24 he issued the registration Number 119 for the construction known as “Arteaga House”, located back then in 3rd street with 54th-21st.

The house consisted of two upper levels, a lower level, five bedrooms, three bathrooms, a living room, a kitchen, a storage room, a maid’s room, a garage, a courtyard, among other facilities. Architect Brunet, influenced to a great extent by his Italian roots, used an architectural language regarded as “Art Nouveau”, which would later become known as Art Deco; a very famous style in the 1950´s.

In October of that same year, architect Arteaga and a handful of neighbors committed to the future of Santafé de Bogotá, departed from the north of the city: on 60th street with 7th avenue, and in the south, from the Military Hospital with 49th street and 3rd avenue. They did so in order to express their firm willingness to establish a privileged community of family homes, and to consolidate a commitment to the future of the most emblematic road in the capital; “Royal Street”.

“Royal Street”, which is known today as 7th  avenue was regarded as such, because it was an obligatory passage for the noble carriages of the time. It represented the main transportation route for the construction materials of these households. The choosing of this last place was not accidental. It´s right there, where restaurants, hotels, bars, and all types of commercial venues operate today. It has vibrated for centuries in the heart of a city located within another city; It´s called Chapinero.